NEWTON SOAKS FOUR CORNERS WHILE EAST SUFFERS JULY LEVEL HEAT!

Written by on September 8, 2016 in Summer 2016, Tropical, United States of America with 0 Comments

We have a lot of weather going on right now. It’s questionable whether Newton crept over the Mexico-US border as a storm or depression but regardless, it’s making it’s presence felt while with flooding rains.

Credit: weather.com

Credit: weather.com

From weather.com

Newton spread heavy rain over parts of Arizona and New Mexico for much of Wednesday, but by Thursday morning, most of the rain will be over.

Newton weakened to a post-tropical cyclone before crossing the international border into Arizona Wednesday afternoon. The last tropical cyclone to reach Arizona as a tropical storm was Tropical Storm Nora in 1997.

(MORE: Hurricane Central)

Rain continues to fall in parts of Arizona and New Mexico in association with Newton’s circulation. In southeast Arizona, southwest and west-central New Mexico, an additional 1 to 2 inches of rain may fall through early Thursday morning, with isolated amounts up to 3 inches possible over higher terrain. 

As of Wednesday evening, the heaviest rain has fallen over Pima County and Cochise County in southern Arizona. Dan Saddle has picked up 5.04 inches of rain, and Miller Carr Canyon has measured 5.67 inches of rain.

Late Wednesday afternoon, Las Cruces, New Mexico, picked up 1 inch of rain in just 20 minutes, according to the National Weather Service.

A couple of high elevation locations in southern Arizona have recorded wind gusts over 50 mph, including 68 mph at Hopkins (elevation 7,120 feet) and 58 mph at Miracle Valley (elevation 7,677 feet). Winds have been much lower than this in the lower elevations.

Flash flooding of normally dry washes and arroyos will be a concern in Arizona and New Mexico with any areas of slow-moving heavy rain.

Fortunately, this will be a relatively short-lived heavy rain threat in the Southwest, fizzling quickly by Thursday.

Newton’s History

Newton rapidly intensified after becoming Tropical Depression Fifteen-E on September 4 to a Category 1 hurricane just 24 hours later.

Newton then made landfall in Cabo San Lucas about 12 hours later as a high-end Category 1 hurricane.

A weather observation station near Cabo San Lucas reported Tuesday morning sustained winds of 78 mph with a gust up to 116 mph, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.

Newton became only the seventh hurricane since 1971 to make landfall near Los Cabos, Mexico. Just over two years ago, Hurricane Odile was the strongest hurricane of record to landfall, there.

(RECAPS: Hurricane Odile | Remnant Moisture Triggered U.S. Flooding)

Hurricane Newton then moved up the southern Baja California peninsula Tuesday. Loreto, Mexico, reported a peak wind gust to 89 mph and 3.78 inches of rain in 24 hours ending early Wednesday morning.

Newton then made its final landfall in northwest Mexico’s Sonora state near the town of Bahia Kino as a tropical storm. 

Here are some peak wind gusts measured during and after this final landfall, according to NHC:

  • 66 mph: Guaymas, Mexico
  • 64 mph: East of Bahia Kino
  • 50 mph: Hermosillo International Airport

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HERMINE CONTINUES TO FADE BUT PRESENT AMAZING SATELLITE PRESENTATION

Credit: NASA

Credit: NASA

Meanwhile, Hermine continues to loose steam over Long Island. Check out this amazing image captured above Long Island of Hermine’s circulation.

Credit: Michael Halpern ‏@halpsci

Credit: Michael Halpern ‏@halpsci

MAJOR RAIN EVENT FROM TEXAS TO OHIO VALLEY

A trough and SE-bound front over the Rockies is pulling Newton’s moisture north while also drawing moisture from the Gulf of Mexico.

Credit: AccuWeather

Credit: AccuWeather

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FEELING MORE LIKE JULY IN EAST

As the Central US system slides east and we have a strong Bermuda high off the EC, sunshine and southwest winds bring the return of mid-summer to the Eastern Seaboard.

Credit: weather.com

Credit: weather.com

Credit: weather.com

Credit: weather.com

Credit: weather.com

Credit: weather.com

See today’s video.

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