>29 March, 2010: A WILD NIGHT AHEAD FOR THE BRITISH ISLES WITH GALES, RAIN AND SNOW!!

Written by on March 29, 2010 in Rest of Europe with 2 Comments

>COLDER WINTER AND NO SUB-TROPICAL ATLANTIC AIR HAS KEPT THE WINDSTORMS ROARING OVER THE IBERIAN PENN THIS WINTER SEASON, BUT TRANSITION TOWARDS SUMMER HAS TRANSPORTED THE AVENUE OF STORMINESS “NOW OVER THE UNITED KINGDOM” ON IT’S JOURNEY TOWARDS THE NORTH AND NOW THE THERMAL CONTRAST AND BAROCLINIC PROPERTIES ARE IN PLACE FOR A STORMY MON NIGHT AND TUESDAY….

After a high of 42 degrees and dry afternoon, the winds have picked up and heavy rains have returned, driven aboard freshening east winds and a temperature that’s continuing to fall through the 30s. After 39 just 2 and a half hours ago, we’re now down to 34 degrees and sleet and snow is mixing with the wind driven rains.

The lack of truely mild, sub-tropical Atlantic air has been the missing property this winter for producing “windstorms” at the UK latitude and the reason for the lack of real “Global Warming induced Windstorms” that Britain has endured regularly and with great force practically winter after winter has been shifted south and the barrel of the gun has been pointed at France and Spain where just last month, windstorm “Xynthia” which screamed into France, Portugal and Spain packing winds gusting to 103 mph in Portugal, 143 mph in Spain and an astonishing 150 mph in France. These winds are at the top of the windscale of European windstorms and like those seen frequently across the British Isles in the warm decades of the late 80s, 90s and early to mid-2000s these Atlantic depressions that become extremely intense are ignited across they cross the Atlantic and often “bomb out” just off or over the British Isles as these system often drag warm, tropical air north, ahead of their fronts and this injection of warm, moist tropical Atlantic air as well as they pull of colder, polar air from the north, often tightens the windfield, increasing windspeed and overall energy release, producing heavier rains, larger sea and ocean swells and ultimately greater damage on land.

Throughout my childhood I, like other young adults that were born in the early 80s have been brought up with a warm world where winters where generally dominated by wet, windy, unsettled winters. There seemed to be a period around the mid to late 90s, where winter storms seemed to roar with greater fury. I remember many great storms by day and by night which roared in, streamed at the house windows, rain would batter at windows and walls, like a bad tempered child not getting their way and trees would shed branches, street lights would rattle back and forth, appearing like, the next big gust would rip it from it’s cement embedded foundation, bins would blown down the street and poorly contructed garden sheds would simply lift off the ground and fly through the air until an unfortunate building or person was unfortunate to be in the path of the large airborne missile.

I have seen many objects fly through the air and massive waves get picked up by severe winds.

Though windstorms can occur pretty much anywhere. Hurricanes which are born of warm core properties and are driven by hot ocean water and thermal contrast with height in the atmosphere, the greatest windstorms which cover far greater distances and pack extreme winds across hundreds and even thousands of miles are born at genrally higher latitudes, where the “baroclinic” contrast between warm and cold air masses drive the larger windstorms on earth.

We see great winterstorms in the polar regions which have produced ferocious blizzards, winds of well over hurricane force that can last days, but during the past 30 years of “Global Warming” in which both Pacific and Atlantic Ocean’s were warm, we saw stronger winds blow as jet streams intensified through contrast between warmth out of the equator and cold out of the pole. Great Britain over the last 30 years has found itself sitting along side a warm North Atlantic, it’s close proximity to the Arctic as well as the very warm water of the Atlantic, has set up a vast thermal contrast zone which has greater intensified the Atlantic jet stream and ultimately intensified the Atlantic storms which form along this jet.

It should be of no surprise that with colder N. Atlantic water surrounding the UK during last summer and fall and the larger, colder air mass covering Europe and much of central Asia has deflected the Atlantic jet stream further south, therefore a much quieter colder winter resulted. My guess is that as the Atlantic cools and we are likely to see in the years ahead a return to a colder than normal North Atlantic (cold AMO, Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation) we may see less windstorms over the UK or at least less frequent or less severe ones. As the Atlantic continued warming through the 90s and a possible peaking in the early 2000s, we also saw some of the greatest windstorms of the last 100 years roar across the UK and Western Europe, this is, I believe closely related to the warming of the Atlantic but this winter may be the first signs of not only a cooling Atlantic and return to a warm AMO but also the reduction in windstorms for the UK’s latitude and reduction in wind speeds achieved within these Atlantic windstorms. Is the Med countries ready to enter an era of stronger, more frequent Atlantic storms and colder, snowier winters for the UK….???

Thanks for reading.
-Mark

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  1. evision says:

    >http://www.sangambayard-c-m.com

  2. Anonymous says:

    >snow hits much of fife, drifting in the greater than hurricane force winds brought by a warm atlantic.

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